Lore for Baldr, God of Wonder & Progress

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  • Baldr was developed in the Council of the Gods forum with the helpful feedback of its members and Allen Stroud.
    An Intro to the Game's Lore offers useful context. Please feel free to use Baldr's lore for any Chaos Reborn purpose.

    Baldr.png
    Baldr prepares for battle.
    Baldr.png (179.44 KiB) Viewed 86 times

    PROFILE:
    Name – Baldr, God of Wonder & Progress
    AvatarBaldrlux, a golden dragon (her story)
    GuildOrder of Baldrlux
    Realm - Hel
    Website: http://baldrlux.com
    Terms of Use - https://www.baldrlux.com/terms-of-use

    SUMMARY:
    To some, Baldr is a once-dead, Norse God who returned from Hel to help mankind when Ragnarok destroyed the world. To others, Baldr is a foul creature who survived millennia because of innumerable, bloody sacrifices and other barbarities committed by his adherents. All of this is true.

    ORIGINS:
    When no Christian priests or inquisitors were near, some Germanic and Scandinavian peoples told tales of their Old Norse Gods. The best of these gods was remembered as Baldr, a god of goodness. Murdered by rival gods, he was doomed to the netherworld of Hel until the great cataclysm, Ragnarok. While all Norse prophesies foretold that Ragnarok would destroy the world, some prophesies offered hope that Baldr would rise from Hel to help mankind.

    RAGNAROK:
    For the Germanic and Scandinavian people who remembered the Old Norse Gods, the increasing number of magical calamities of the 14th century heralded Ragnarok. Many abandoned the relatively new Christian churches around them and began to make increasingly large and sometimes bloody sacrifices to the shrines of the Old Norse Gods, including Baldr. Thus, as the world literally began to break, Baldr returned from Hel mounted on the back of a golden dragon. Too late to prevent Ragnarok, Baldr nonetheless managed to save some of mankind’s realms and their peoples.

    AFTERMATH:
    In striving to save as many as possible from the ruination of Ragnarok, Baldr gathered together a coterie of determined wizards, sharing with them both great lore and power. The mightiest of these wizards became demigods, if they were not already. Many died in the struggle to save what little of the world they could. All, including Baldr, were greatly diminished by the effort expended to save both themselves and others. In this context, Baldr and those wizards aligned with him seek to develop a plan that assures the weal of mankind into the future.

    CURRENT ATTITUDES:
    Humans – Humans as individuals can be short-sighted fools… just like gods. But if given sovereignty over their own destiny, mankind will make wonders that no one can now imagine.
    Alchemists – These Nephilim often are the best of humanity, though some are swayed by gods and wizards with ideas or else ambitions which impede the true wonders which a sovereign humanity is capable.
    Wizards – These Egregoroi mirror humanity more than they realize. That they can achieve a godhood clouds the vision of so many as to what the purpose of godhood is.
    Followers – Some of them amaze with the realms of wonder that they create. Others... disappoint. All that can be done will be done to ensure that gods do not get in their way.
    Gods – Too many gods stand between mortals and the true potential of their civilizations. Those who prevent mankind from making its own choices, for good or ill, need to be opposed.

    RUMORED HISTORY:
    Baldr is a truly ancient god who has been worshipped under different names by people forgotten before the birth of the first Norsemen. He may have been a god for the Romans (Janus), the Carthaginians (Baal), the ancient Greeks and Phoenicians (Cronus), the earliest Egyptians (Osiris), the Akkadians and Babylonians (Dagon), and even the Sumerians (Ba’el). Some who know these facts believe that the other Norse gods imprisoned him in Hel to prevent him from eroding their power by bringing civilization to the Norsemen.
    ___________________________

      One Theme to rule them all, One Theme to find them, One Theme to bring them all and in the Chaos bind them.
      NoWorries plays as Baldr, God of Wonder & Progress | Compete together with Baldr in the Order of Baldrlux
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    NoWorries
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  • FORGOTTEN LORE

    BACKGROUND:
    Until now, the information below was available only to members of the Council of the Gods forum. In-game, much of this information is, at best, obscure. Consider that Baldr himself likely does not remember some of it.

    Synopsis – Baldr helped civilizations rise. He also unleashed barbarisms that scarred the soul of mankind. Now, he is a god who himself worships the wonders of which mortals are capable. And he opposes all obstacles to their progress.

    Birth – Long before Sumerians built their first urban hut along the Euphrates, a lone woman trekked through the wilds of Mesopotamia. She was wounded, sickly, and heavy with child when she collapsed before the encampment of a nomadic hill tribe. She died as her body gave birth to a boy, who the tribe adopted. They named him Ba’el, which meant “Life of Death” in their tonal tongue. Millennia later, Ba’el would be known as Baldr.

    Magic – Ba’el grew in to a preternatural hunter without knowledge of his true lineage. He regularly stalked the hills of Mesopotamia to hunt for his tribe. One night, Ba’el came upon a wild goat drinking from a stream. Stepping shadow to shadow, Ba’el approached from downwind. Just as Ba’el raised his spear to strike, moonlight pierced the clouds and revealed him. The wild goat then lifted his head and spoke, “Choose magic or meat.” Ba’el answered by dropping his spear. So the goat changed into a manlike form and gave Ba’el the magic of shapeshifting and the knowing of wild things. The goat god eventually went on his way. Ba’el returned to his tribe as a shaman with powerful magic.

    Ascendance – With the guidance of Ba’el, the hunters of his tribe always found the game they needed to survive, even in the driest seasons. In gratitude, Ba’el and his people would sacrifice their surplus to the wild goat god. Generations passed. Ba’el did not age and die like the rest of his people, and his power grew… along with the numbers of his tribe. But as the tribe grew, hunters began to return from hunts without game. When hunger began to whisper among his people, Ba’el found the wild goats and sheep in all the hills in his world, and he spoke away their wildness. He then led the sheep and goats home and taught his tribe to tend them into plenty. The people of Ba’el gained excess beyond the ken of any of their legends. So they began to sacrifice to Ba’el rather than the wild goat god. Ba’el let them. Thus, Ba’el became a god.

    Death – Over generations, more people began to sacrifice to Ba’el as his home tribe grew and his tame herds spread to others. This begat more power for Ba’el. Which in turn increased the numbers of his followers. This cycle of growth came to an end when his tribe migrated on to the lands of an early city people of Sumer. The city’s god challenged Ba’el and defeated him in single combat in front of all of their peoples. As the city’s god raised his mace over the mortally-injured Ba’el for a killing blow, Ba’el invoked all of his godly powers in a rage to live. The weapon struck true, braining Ba’el. He died. Or so it seemed.

    Rebirth – Nine months later, a woman gave birth while her man sacrificed to their god, whose passing they would not have believed if they had heard. After all, the sacrifice let both the woman and her babe survive! The parents did not realize that their newborn son was incarnated in to their now reborn god, Ba’el. The baby’s howls were fury at being trapped helplessly in a small body without any of the great powers to which Ba’el had grown accustomed. Much like a stroke victim, Ba’el had to relearn basic competences as his body matured in step with its age. And he knew that he was vulnerable to true death any of these days. Try though he did, Ba’el did not regain even the goat god’s magical legacy until he reached puberty. Then, Ba’el changed his shape into his last godlike form and reclaimed a rudimentary godhood, for some still sacrificed to him.

    Godhood – For his first few millennia, Ba’el was known under various names as a shepherd or death god. But he became much more than that. Ba’el gained knowledge for every lifetime he lived and death he survived. Chief among his lore was an understanding that his true immortality came from having a large number of dedicated followers. But the ancient world was rich in gods. And they wielded their peoples to compete viciously to maintain ascendance. In fact, Ba’el himself introduced child sacrifice along with other barbarities in an attempt to prevent dead gods from returning as he did. He also found that enough such sacrifices could help fuel a quicker reconstitution in the event his physical incarnation was murdered again, which it was. Yet, he also facilitated the growth of civilization in his peoples, even if only to secure his immortality among them. Thus, in his various incarnations, Ba’el became known as a lesser or greater god to many peoples: e.g., Sumerians—Ba’el, Gunara, Geshtu; Egyptians—Osiris; Akkadians/Babylonians—Dagon; Phoenicians/Greeks—Cronus; Carthaginians—Baal; Romans—Janus.

    Enlightenment – In the Phoenician colony of Carthage, Baal (Baldr) was the primary god. As he had for millennia, he condoned child sacrifice to secure his power while using his power to better the progress of his people. However, in the century of Confucius and Buddha, a Nephilim came to Carthage and spoke prophecies of how mankind was capable of wonder. The Carthaginians executed the prophet cruelly before Baal could intervene. But Baal learned of his words and was struck deeply by them. The other gods of Carthage saw this as weakness, so Baal fled before being murdered again. His flight ended among the early Romans. In presenting himself to the Romans as a god, Baal adopted the name of the dead prophet, Janus.

    Empire – Unlike all times before, Janus did not use his power directly to uplift the Romans in exchange for obeisance. Rather, he dispensed advice when it was needed and let his people make their own choices and solve their own problems. Thus, Janus helped the rise of Rome. But with free will came poor choices. The Romans, as they spread, fell under the influence of a number of foreign gods who began pulling the threads of Roman society asunder. After the murder of yet another emperor in the 3rd century CE, left Rome to find a new people the untamed wilds of Germania.

    Exile – In Germania, he was called Baldr. He brought lore and trappings of civilization, but conflict ensued with rival Germanic gods which almost resulted in his obliteration. As a result, he fell in to a centuries-long Reverie deep beneath the earth. Such was his impact before he fell into Reverie that his name came to be known for goodness among the Norse peoples who worshipped him for centuries thereafter. Baldr was thought to be trapped in the Norse Hel, and Baldr in fact dreamed this as reality in his Reverie. Legends told that he would return to save mankind from Ragnarok, a cataclysmic conflict of gods and men which would destroy the Earth.

    Ragnarok – For the Germanic and Scandinavian people who remembered the Old Norse Gods, the increasing number of magical calamities of the 14th century heralded Ragnarok. Many abandoned the relatively new Christian churches around them and began to make increasingly large and sometimes bloody sacrifices to the shrines of the Old Norse Gods, including Baldr. Thus, as the world literally began to break, he woke from his Reverie. Baldr returned from Hel mounted on the back of a golden dragon called Baldrlux. Too late to prevent Ragnarok, Baldr nonetheless managed to save some of mankind’s realms and their peoples.

    Aftermath – In striving to save as many as possible from the ruination of Ragnarok, Baldr gathered together a coterie of determined wizards, sharing with them both great lore and power. The mightiest of these wizards became demigods, if they were not already. Many died in the struggle to save what little of the world they could. All, including Baldr, were greatly diminished by the effort expended to save both themselves and others. In this context, Baldr and those wizards aligned with him seek to develop a plan that assures the weal of mankind into the future.

    NOTES AND IDEAS:
    Ancient Egypt – One of the reasons I picked Osiris as an early alter ego of Baldr was because he was murdered early in the history of the Egyption gods. It's the other gods who attributed to him being the god of death. In my imagination, the Pharaonic rituals to survive into the afterlife were a human attempt to mirror the rituals that Baldr (as Osiris) and perhaps other Egregoroi gods of Egypt used to ensure that they were reborn in the event that, like Osiris, they were murdered.

    Rome – For the millennia through to the 6th century BCE, Baldr was your basic, traditional practical god. Then he met that Nephilim prophet "Janus" in Carthage. This Janus inspires Baldr to change his ways somewhat. After the Egregoroi of Carthage kill the Nephilim Janus, Baldr flees to early Rome and adopts Janus's name as his own. It is here that Baldr develops his first iterations of his ultimate plan to help free humanity from the gods and develops the early Roman pantheon. Being one of the older of the gods then around, he capitalizes on his history and such to talk other gods, Egregoroi, and Nephilim to join in with his plan. Some of them have their own ideas of course. But overall, things seem to work well for Rome and those who join its pantheon. But it also explains why the Roman Janus in history is remembered as the god of change... with two heads. Perhaps because he was an old god with a new god image? Anyway, as the number of gods within the Roman pantheon grow, so do the number of versions of the Plan being advanced. And this plays a role in the destruction of the Roman Empire.
    ___________________________

      One Theme to rule them all, One Theme to find them, One Theme to bring them all and in the Chaos bind them.
      NoWorries plays as Baldr, God of Wonder & Progress | Compete together with Baldr in the Order of Baldrlux
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    NoWorries
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    Posts: 5013
    Joined: Fri Apr 18, 2014 4:17 am
    Location: Baldrlux.com


  • Cool stuff! I might be putting some of this to use in my latest realm. Thinking of having some interplay between Baldrlux's faction and Hegemony (from the perspective of some of the Anu dudes)
    anjovi
     
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